killing me softly:How to criticize employees better

So the goal you set out for your company wasn’t met. The problem: your employee’s incompetence. The challenge: To tell it to their faces without your employee wanting to quit his job at the end.

Its always tempting to find fault in others – whether it’s someone you hate or someone you want to help do better. But when it comes to employees, you might want to be subtle with the criticisim. The tricky thing with criticism is that no matter how you address it, its always going to sound a little mean. You don’t want to be hurting feelings where you’re trying to get some actual advice across.

Call it Positive Suggestion: Many people feel uneasy when someone tries to criticize them. The natural defense mechanism kicks in and they either zone out and stop listening to you or, take your advice but still feel a bit of revulsion towards you. “It is better to put them in a positive state of mind,” says Vidhan Rana of Biruwa Ventures. “Start with a compliment or something positive about their work.” Instead of using sentences like – “The method you used is wrong…”, go for something nicer like “What could improve the result is…” Do it in a way that gets the point across without demoralizing them.

NO to the four-letter word: Not only does using foul language make you look bad, but your team mates are likely to focus on just that and forget the rest of your message. Keep the rough language to the freedom of your bathroom. Its inappropriate and unnecessary at work. Respect your team mates and employees.

Nothing Personal: Nepalese are generally very sensitive people; we tend to take things to heart. “Taking things personally is a habit we really need to break,” says Mr. Rana. Try to avoid including your employees’ personal habits employees in conversations. Their taste in clothes has little to do with the way they work. Focus on the actions; not on the person.

Improvement, that’s the point: The point of criticism is not making others look or feel bad. Don’t forget that you are giving constructive suggestions to help your team perform better as a whole. As a leader, you should look at the benefit of the company. Helping each individual realize their flaws will also help them discover their self worth. With constructive criticism, you give your employees a chance to view themselves in the eyes of others, of how they are perceived and what they need to change to be more effective. Criticism is tricky. Be too rough and you won’t get the point across; too nice and you’re just showering praise. As a leader, learn to take the middle path. Help each individual face their faults to get further as a team.

Its always tempting to find fault in others – whether it’s someone you hate or someone you want to help do better. But when it comes to employees, you might want to be subtle with the criticisim. The tricky thing with criticism is that no matter how you address it, its always going to sound a little mean. You don’t want to be hurting feelings where you’re trying to get some actual advice across.

Call it Positive Suggestion: Many people feel uneasy when someone tries to criticize them. The natural defense mechanism kicks in and they either zone out and stop listening to you or, take your advice but still feel a bit of revulsion towards you. “It is better to put them in a positive state of mind,” says Vidhan Rana of Biruwa Ventures. “Start with a compliment or something positive about their work.” Instead of using sentences like – “The method you used is wrong…”, go for something nicer like “What could improve the result is…” Do it in a way that gets the point across without demoralizing them.

NO to the four-letter word: Not only does using foul language make you look bad, but your team mates are likely to focus on just that and forget the rest of your message. Keep the rough language to the freedom of your bathroom. Its inappropriate and unnecessary at work. Respect your team mates and employees.

Nothing Personal: Nepalese are generally very sensitive people; we tend to take things to heart. “Taking things personally is a habit we really need to break,” says Mr. Rana. Try to avoid including your employees’ personal habits employees in conversations. Their taste in clothes has little to do with the way they work. Focus on the actions; not on the person.

Improvement, that’s the point: The point of criticism is not making others look or feel bad. Don’t forget that you are giving constructive suggestions to help your team perform better as a whole. As a leader, you should look at the benefit of the company. Helping each individual realize their flaws will also help them discover their self worth. With constructive criticism, you give your employees a chance to view themselves in the eyes of others, of how they are perceived and what they need to change to be more effective. Criticism is tricky. Be too rough and you won’t get the point across; too nice and you’re just showering praise. As a leader, learn to take the middle path. Help each individual face their faults to get further as a team.

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